LANXESS Pigments Add Color to Rio Olympics

  • At the summer games in Rio, Bayferrox adds color to the Brazilian Sports Park in Barra da Tijuca
  • Red and black pigments from the Inorganic Pigments business unit enhance the park grounds

 

 

Cologne - Inorganic pigments from specialty chemicals company LANXESS have added color to many major sporting events in the past. Now the products from the successful Bayferrox range are to do the same for the Sports Park in Barra da Tijuca, Brazil. “From August 5 to 21, 2016, when 10,000 athletes from 166 countries compete in 28 sporting events at the summer games in Rio, both the participants and spectators will literally be walking on LANXESS,” says Jörg Hellwig, head of the LANXESS Inorganic Pigments business unit. That’s because much of the area around the venues is colored with black and red pigments from LANXESS.

 

Premium pigments for design and safety

The "Olympic Way", a boulevard of black and light gray concrete paving stones, meanders along the entire stretch from the entrance, past the 15 venues, to the tip of the triangular grounds. The eight-centimeter-thick stones, placed in a wave shape, symbolize the confluence of the Rio Negro and Rio Solimões (Amazon River). The black-water Rio Negro gets its dark coloring form its high content of humic and fulvic acids, while the white-water Rio Solimões looks white when viewed at an angle on account of the mineral-based solids suspended in it. The rivers flow adjacent to one another over a distance of 11 kilometers before eventually converging. The concrete paving stones symbolizing this “Meeting of the Waters” were manufactured with over 40 metric tons of the iron oxide black pigments Bayferrox 318 and Bayferrox 340.

Numerous quiet zones around the venues are also of colored design, as is the large square in front of the public viewing park right off the boulevard. Their prominent red coloring comes from Bayferrox pigments. Drainage stones measuring 40x40x8 centimeters and colored with over 20 metric tons of Bayferrox 110 have been laid over more than 12,000 square meters of the park. These highly water-permeable paving stones prevent puddles from forming after heavy rainfall.

Bayferrox pigments are also a prominent feature in the athlete’s village: the microasphalt for the cycle paths here was colored with Bayferrox 130 iron oxide red pigment. The red coloring helps to enhance traffic safety by clearly marking the cycle paths as separate from the gray concrete pedestrian walkways. Even after the games are over, the colored surfaces will retain their brilliant appearance for decades to come thanks to the pigments’ outstanding weather resistance.

 

Sustainability first

Sustainability was of major importance to the organizers in designing the Sports Park in Barra da Tijuca. For example, water cisterns and treatment plants have been installed, and the subsequent utilization of the area as a new city quarter was included in the planning process from the outset. LANXESS, with all its various business fields, is a strong partner for sustainability. Its production processes are designed to conserve resources and preserve the environment – and to be safe and sustainable. All production facilities are certified to DIN ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 and audited regularly. State-of-the-art waste gas and wastewater treatment facilities at the respective sites help to avoid emissions almost entirely. For more information on LANXESS pigments, go to www.bayferrox.com.

 

LANXESS is a leading specialty chemicals company with sales of EUR 7.9 billion in 2015 and about 16,600 employees in 29 countries. The company is currently represented at 52 production sites worldwide. The core business of LANXESS is the development, manufacturing and marketing of chemical intermediates, specialty chemicals and plastics. Through ARLANXEO, the joint venture with Saudi Aramco, LANXESS is also a leading supplier of synthetic rubber. LANXESS is listed in the leading sustainability indices Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI World) and FTSE4Good

 

Click below to get a sample of LANXESS inorganic pigments!

President Obama Signs TSCA Reform Legislation

From NACD ChemBytes:

(June 22, 2016)  President Obama signed H.R. 2576, the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act that reforms the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The reform bill, which overhauls our nation's chemical management system, was passed earlier this year by both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate with overwhelmingly bipartisan support. NACD will be providing a short summary and transition document for members soon to help them prepare for the near term implementation items. The association thanks all those involved over the years in making this important legislative victory possible.

 

Video courtesy of C-SPAN

 

Ohio You Be the Chemist Champ Nearly Goes the Distance

 

 

On Monday, June 20, 2016, 39 participants from around the country made their way to the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia to compete in the 2016 You Be the Chemist National Challenge.
 
The field was comprised of middle school students from 39 states, including Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico, who won their respective state qualifiers to advance to the National Challenge.


This year was Palmer Holland’s fourth year organizing the northeast Ohio local qualifier. We were represented in Philadelphia by our Ohio champion, Tom Schlomi, and represent he did!

 
After 11 increasingly difficult rounds, Tom finished in 2nd place after losing by a single question in a Championship Tiebreaker Round to 13-year-old Jevin Liu.


Along with 2nd place, Tom earned a $5,000 educational scholarship, TI-84 Plus Calculator, National Park Annual Pass, and a chemistry set. Congratulations to Tom, his family, and all the participants in the 2016 National Challenge!

 

Picture (L-R): Sam Kwedder, Tom Schlomi, Sam Metzger, and Charlie Laurie

TSCA Reform Legislation Passes Congress



Arlington, VA
June 7, 2016

From the NACD.com press release archive

National Association of Chemical Distributors (NACD) President Eric R. Byer issued the following statement today on the final passage by the U.S. Senate of H.R. 2576, the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act that resolves the differences between House and Senate versions of Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) reform legislation.

“As Congress sends the bipartisan TSCA reform package to President Obama for his signature, NACD applauds lawmakers in both the House and Senate for their commitment to making significant improvements to chemical management and modernizing the decades-old system regulating chemicals. We now strongly urge the President to sign the bill without delay.

“Forty years of operating under an outdated law and more than 10 years of attempts at reform have demonstrated that TSCA was in desperate need of improvement. We are pleased to see that lawmakers in both chambers worked across party lines to create a more cohesive federal system for regulating chemicals in the marketplace that gives consumers additional confidence regarding the safety of chemicals while also providing industry and regulators alike with greater regulatory certainty.

“NACD thanks Senate and House leadership and especially Senators Inhofe, Udall, Vitter, Markey, Merkley, Booker, and Whitehouse, along with Congressmen Upton, Pallone, and Shimkus for fostering the bipartisan support necessary to get the final bill across the finish line.” 

 

According to the American Chemistry Council, the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act improves and strengthens TSCA by:

  • Subjecting all new and existing chemicals to an EPA safety review
  • Requiring EPA to focus on chemicals that are the highest priorities for full risk-based safety assessments
  • Strengthening transparency and the quality of science used to make EPA decisions
  • Expanding EPA’s ability to require additional health and safety testing of chemicals
  • Allowing industry to request that EPA conduct a safety assessment on a specific chemical
  • Providing EPA with a full range of options to address the risks of substances including labeling requirements, use restrictions, phase-outs or other appropriate actions
  • Setting aggressive and attainable timelines for EPA to complete its work
  • Promoting cooperation between state and federal regulators while creating a strong national chemical regulatory system, ensuring interstate commerce is not disadvantaged
  • Strengthening protections for the most vulnerable like infants, children and the elderly
  • Protecting Confidential Business Information (CBI)

For more information on the legislation, vist https://www.americanchemistry.com/TSCA/